It has to open eventually, right?

Ice forming.jpgThis time of year is always tough on “soft water” anglers, I think.  I’m not one to really head out on the ice and go ice fishing, so I am one of those people looking out the window, hoping the sun will come out and warm things up enough to melt the snow and ice and let me get back to fishing.

Today was a really nice day, 50 degrees on the way home from work.  And tomorrow is projected to be nice as well.  I can even deal with a couple of days of rain – that helps, too.  But then comes the weekend with highs in the 30s once again. But it has to go away eventually, right?  Right? Some years it seems like that won’t be the case.

I suppose we really shouldn’t complain too much.  We did have a fairly mild winter.  We didn’t get a lot of snow and it was not too drastically cold for too long.  But spring sure is taking its sweet time getting here!

I do still have plenty to do before I hit the open water.  I’ve got line to spool on reels, treble hooks to change on crankbaits.  It’s just that both of those things are much more enjoyable when I sit in front of the picture window and I’m not looking out on a snow-covered landscape.  That being said, I guess I better get those tasks done before the weekend!

I know some people have been out fishing already in the BFLs, Opens, and Angler’s Choice, and it’s been great to see some people I know finish so well.  And walleye tournaments around the state are getting ready to get started as early as this weekend – stay safe and wear your life jackets! I hope you all have a great year on the water, with even a personal best or two thrown in there for good measure.

We have fishing season and buying season

In Wisconsin winters are long and cold.  That goes without saying.  We expect it and we always know it’s coming.  But we’re still sad when we put our boats away for the winter and think about having to wait it out until April, at least, to get back onto “soft water”.

But at least we have “buying season” to keep us entertained, right?   I don’t know about anyone else, but for me this is a great time to… well, buy stuff.  As soon as the season ends, I’m making lists of what I need to replenish for next year. Terminal tackle, line, soft plastics. There is no doubt I will need all of these things before the next season starts.

Part of this “buying season”, though, is also “Throwing season.” We all have stuff that we thought we would use the crap out of during the season.  As it winds up, we bought four packs each of three different colors, tied one on for three different tournaments, and never even threw it once.  Those plastics are going to sit at the bottom of a bin somewhere on the outside chance that we’ll dig them out and use them again some day… I mean actually use them, not just tie them on and throw them in the bottom of the boat without ever even throwing them.

When it comes to that part of “buying season”, I think we should all look around.  We should see who might really use that stuff that we bought and never threw. Is there a youth group, a high school team, or just a kid you see at the launch ramp all the time who could use that stuff that you’re about to throw into a bin or a closet somewhere and forget about for a few years? I’m guessing there is a better use for those things we all hang on to and will never use.  There is a kid at every launch ramp asking a hundred different questions about fishing. He’ll show you his Zebco 33 or she will tell you about the “one that got away” from that dock just last week.

They are the future of our sport.  And I think it makes sense to feed that passion.  It makes sense to take a few minutes and help him learn how to cast or to show her how to put a worm on her hook.  We all do it.  Most of us take that time.  So, next time, while we are taking the time to talk to those kids, why not take some of our baits we will probably never use anyway. Let’s face it, we have our confidence baits. Those are what we catch our fish on.  But we will still try out other baits.  Maybe that bait will become the confidence bait of a 10-year-old at your local park or launch ramp. Why not pull that stuff out of wherever we have it hidden and make sure we have a pack of baits to throw to a kid when we see them? Not only will it make a great connection between our generation and the next… but it will leave us more room for “buying season”!  But, honestly, if we have it laying around, chances are really good that there is a kid out there that would love to have just a pack or two of baits of his or her own.  And I think we owe it to the future of our sport.  I’m going to go look in my “throw away” bin right now… and I hope you do, too.

KastKing launches awesome new line!

KastKing Launches Tournament Grade 
Monofilament Fishing Line
 
Advanced chemical formula from KastKing® creates dynamic Masters Mono fishing line for anglers who demand the best. 
(For Immediate Release – Garden City, Long Island NY – November  30, 2015) The KastKing® division of Eposeidon, Inc. (www.eposeidon.com) that manufactures fishing reels, rods, and line will offer a new high grade fishing line – KastKing® Masters Monofilament Fishing Line for 2016.
KastKing Masters Mono Introduced for 2016

KastKing® Masters professional tournament grade monofilament fishing line features outstanding smoothness for farther casting distance and more abrasion resistance than standard mono line.  Its unique chemical formula blend results in lower friction through fishing rod line guides. KastKing® Masters Mono has minimum stretch for improved hook-setting and low line memory for better control.  It also has more clarity under water than typical monofilament lines, which is an important factor when targeting line-shy species.

“KastKing® Masters Monofilament Fishing Line is exceptional.  It is a superior mono line product for tournament anglers looking for ultimate performance mono line at an affordable price,” says Tom Gahan marketing director at Eposeidon. “Its quality and features are extraordinary.”

KastKing® worked with chemical engineers from around the world and used new manufacturing methods and equipment developed to produce Masters Mono. “We will also continue to make our current KastKing® mono line, which is good stuff. KastKing® Masters Monofilament Fishing Line is for pros and recreational anglers looking for an edge,” added Gahan.

Crystal Clear KastKing® Masters Monofilament fishing line  comes in attractive packaging and is available on 300 yard/ 274 meter spools in 4 lb. / 1.8 kg., 6 lb. / 2.7 kg., 8 lb. / 3.6 kg., 10 lb. / 4.5 kg., 12 lb. / 5.4 kg., 14 lb. / 6.3 kg., 17 lb. / 7.7 kg., 20 lb. / 9.0 kg. , 25 lb. / 11.3 kg., and 30 lb. / 13.6 kg. test.  MSRP 4 lb. $10.98 USD, 6 lb. $11.98 USD, all other sizes are $12.98 USD.

KastKing® Masters Monofilament fishing line will sell below $10 USD throughwww.eposeidon.com,  http://www.kastking.com , Amazon.com, and other exclusive online retailers

View the KastKing® Masters Monofilament Fishing Line trailer here:

Crankbaits are Great Fishing Lures for Fall Bass

Many anglers start to put their fishing equipment away and winterize their boats when fall hits.  But many other anglers know that fall can mean just the start of some great fishing.  When the water temperatures start to drop, that is the signal to the bass that fall is close at hand.  They start to feed heavily in preparation for winter.

In the winter months, when the water temperatures are at their lowest, bass prefer not to chase bait fish.  They don’t like to move around much at all, if they can help it.  With that being said, fall is the time that bass start to build up their winter reserves.  This is not to say that every day on the water in the fall will be a fish fest, but there can be some awesome fishing when the leaves turn and the temperatures start to dip.  There are a number of fishing lures that anglers can use to get more fish to the boat in the fall.

When hunting for fall bass, one fishing lure that anglers should not disregard is the crankbait.  In the fall, crankbaits with a tight wiggle, rather than a wide wobble, are best.  They do a great job at imitating sick or injured bait fish.  Not only that, but you can cover a lot of water quickly.    They can also be slow-rolled along the bottom to look like a fleeing crayfish.  For this reason, crankbaits are popular with bass anglers throughout the entire fishing season.  In fall, when fish are feeding heavily, they can help anglers cover water and pattern the fish more quickly.

Once you find the fish, you might want to change your fishing lure selection.  You may want to slow down and throw a jig or a plastic worm.  For instance, if you’ve found fish on rock humps with a crank bait, you can then slow down and throw a slower bait.  Fish often congregate near rocks as the water cools because rocks hold heat.  At other times, you may find fish holding near wood or brush piles in shallower water.  Likely there will be deeper water near that cover.  Many anglers use wood crankbaits in heavier cover because they float up faster once the angler stops reeling.  Often this can avoid some of the snags anglers would otherwise experience.  But, switching to a slower moving bait can trigger strikes that crank baits do not.

Crankbaits are great lures to use to cover water and find fish.  Anglers should keep in mind, though, that different conditions call for different colors and sizes.  Try to match the forage as closely as possible when using crankbaits.  In darker water, brighter colors may work great.  In clear water, turn to more natural colors.  It is important that the crankbait you are throwing looks as much as possible like the forage on which the fish are feeding.  The closer you can match that, the more fish you will bring to the boat.

Once an angler has decided on the fishing lures to try for the day, all that is left is to find a lake in Wisconsin to fish.  With so many lakes all over the state, anglers are sure to find a great place to fish any day of the week this fall.
This article was written in association with FishingTackleLures.com.au

Check out Eposeidon

I’ve been working with Eposeidon for some time now, first in the capacity of a freelance writer, and then I was asked to join Team Eposeidon.  Since then I’ve had the opportunity to talk to a lot of different people about Eposeidon and KastKing reels, rods, and line.  People have asked me how they can keep their prices so low if their products are as high quality as I say they are.  Well, they’ve come up with this cool little video to explain just that, so I thought I would share it here.

I’ve been using the reels and the line since the beginning of this fishing season, and I am very impressed.  I’ve been using the KastKing Royale 6.3:1 bait casting reel all year and I have to say that it compares very closely to my Pinnacle Optimus X s that I’ve been using for the last few years.  And it’s much less than half the price. So, if you’re in the market for a new reel or a new rod, check out KastKing.  And if you’re needing line to get through those last few tournaments of the year, KastKing has Copolymer (which I’ve also been using all year with great results), fluorocarbon, mono, and even some really tough braid that I’ve used for dragging those big fish out of heavy cover.

Check out Eposeidon’s line of KastKing products, and check out this video if you get a chance, too.  You’ll be glad you did.

Eposeidon’s Manufacturer to Consumer business model.

Salmon season outlook full of uncertainty

Some thoughts on the Salmon season this year

The Outdoor Journal

Anglers can anticipate catching salmon again this summer, though the Lake Michigan alewife population remains at an all-time low. Photo: Howard Meyerson. Anglers can anticipate catching salmon again this summer, though the Lake Michigan alewife population remains at an all-time low. Photo: Howard Meyerson.

By Howard Meyerson

The 2015 salmon season is just getting underway and what anglers can expect remains uncertain. Lake Michigan fishing typically picks up in May but just where in the lake depends on water temperature. And so far lake waters have been uniformly very cold.

“It’s tough to pinpoint where the chinooks will be when water temperatures are the same around the lake,” said Jay Wesley, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources Lake Michigan basin coordinator. “But, fishing for lake trout, coho salmon, steelhead and brown trout has been decent. And I know of one 17-pound (chinook) that has been caught.”

Charter anglers around St. Joseph have had intermittent luck with chinooks so far. One recently called to share that fishing was sporadic — a 30-fish-day with…

View original post 562 more words

The Tournament Season is in Full Swing!

Tournament season has started, and I’ve fished two club tournaments, and have another big one coming up this weekend.  I say “big one”, but it’s not like I’m fishing the Elites or the FLW or anything.  But, for me, it’s a bigger tournament than a club tourney.    I’ll be fishing the first tournament of the year with the Upper Midwest Bass Challenge Series.  These guys are definitely a step above how I view a lot of club tournaments.  Don’t think I don’t think the guys in either of my bass clubs are good sticks, though.  Here’s my take on club tournaments.

In club tournaments, you have a really great dose of competition.  Every angler wants to win and they relish in bringing in a heavier bag to the scales at the end of the day.  But, in club tournaments, everyone gets along, and often they not only fish together, but are friends outside of the club.  For me, bass clubs exist to help everyone learn more about techniques, bodies of water, styles of fishing, and different lures that come along.  I think that bass clubs are about learning from other people.

That is not to say that you can’t learn anything from other anglers at team trails, opens, and other events, but there is more at stake.  The pots are obviously bigger, as are the bragging rights.  I love that idea, but it also makes it feel different than a simple club tourney.  And it should feel different.  It’s a different playing field and the players are more competitive at that level.  I’ve fished another team trail, the Central Wisconsin River Series presented by Minn Kota, Humminbird, and Point Beer, for a couple years now.  But this will be my first year with the U.M.B.C.S., and I’m not going to tell you that I’m not at least a bit nervous.  And I think you should be, going into a big tournament.  I think being nervous is good, because it makes you think harder and it makes you concentrate more.  At least that is the case with me.

I don’t think you can progress as an angler without checking out other circuits, some opens, and maybe even fishing with more than one club.  I think it’s almost a necessity.  That doesn’t make it easy and, for someone like me, who is fairly new to the tournament world, it may even be a bit intimidating.  But you just have to trust in yourself and your abilities, and then let the cards fall where they may.  Win, lose, or draw, this weekend will be a great experience for me, and I’m looking forward to competing against these guys.

So, bring on the weekend, the new competitors, and the new body of water.  I’ve been on the water only once, but luckily Rod, my partner in fishing and life, has been on it before.  It’s been years, but he at least has an idea of the lay of the land.  I only hope I can be helpful in the decision making process on the water.  I’m looking forward to all of the challenges that this tournament fishing year has to offer.

Good luck and tight lines, all!