RIO HOW TO: The Double Haul

Check out this incredibly informative video explaining the double-haul in fly fishing. Fly fishing techniques can be intimidating, but this video really breaks it down and makes it easy!

The Ozark Fly Fisher Journal

From RIO:

In this episode of RIO’s “How To” series, RIO brand manager Simon Gawesworth shows how easy it is to learn the double haul – a highly useful casting skill that will give you more distance, greater line control and more effect in a tough wind. The Double Haul is an essential skill to master for anyone who wants to fish in saltwater.

RIO’s “How To” videos are a series of short films that explain all you need to know to learn a particular way to fish, or cast. Where applicable, each film talks through the gear that you need, shows how to rig the gear, how to read the water, and how to fish that particular technique.

These invaluable lessons for the fly fisher are packed with information and top tips, and each one is bought to you by a RIO employee or a RIO brand ambassador.

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Awash in Microplastics: Great Lakes Studies Raise Questions

A very interesting article about micro plastics. It’s not just microbeads that are the problem for the Great Lakes and their tributaries. A very worthwhile read!

The Outdoor Journal

16807991226_08b707d645_o Schooner Inland Seas sails on  Grand Traverse Bay as students study microplastics in the Great Lakes. Photo courtesy of ISEA.

By Howard Meyerson

When the schooner Inland Seas slips her berth at Suttons Bay on June 24, her captain, crew and passengers will share in a voyage of discovery—a two-hour educational journey under sail to learn about microplastics, an emerging environmental problem that ills the Great Lakes.

The two-year-old program, called “Exploring Microplastics,” is offered by the Inland Seas Education Association (ISEA), a nonprofit that teaches Great Lakes science aboard the 61-foot schooner. Its passengers will examine what crew members find while conducting a fine-mesh trawl for plankton. They will learn how tiny plastic particles enter the food chain and a lot more about how microplastics foul Great Lakes waters.

Jeanie Williams, ISEA’s lead scientist and education specialist, says plastic pollution is common in Lake Michigan. She and the ship’s…

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Spring hearings

Everywhere in Wisconsin tonight, in every county, outdoorsmen and outdoorswomen had the chance to voice their opinions. They had the chance to attend a spring hearings meeting to let the DNR know what they thought of any proposed rules and also to vote on some resolutions proposed by their peers.  _DSC0727.JPG

This was the scene in Oneida County.  There were approximately 70 people who stayed for the meeting.  Of course, there was the option to fill out the questionnaire and then leave.  And  few people did that.  I think it’s great that they took the time to come out and voice their opinions. I understand that everyone is super-busy and it’s hard to find the time to go and do these things.

One thing was interesting, and I just thought of it writing this.  There was only one kid in the room tonight, and I don’t think I’ve seen anyone bring their children to the spring hearings in the last several years that I’ve attended. Outdoorsmen and outdoorswomen talk quite a bit about the next generation and what is best for them.  Yet they never bring their children to one of the best events every year, where kids can learn how the rule process works and how they can challenge the status quo in the world of the outdoors.  For kids who are the future of our outdoor sporting heritage, venues such as this give them a chance to think about what is important to them. They have a chance to learn and grow as thinking people. They will see not only their parents’ point of view, but the point of view and ideas of others. From there they can make their own informed decisions, and maybe even do more research, about different things that do and will effect the future of the sports we love.  Why are there no children at these events?  It’s puzzling. That one kid, by the way, is now a youth member of our CDAC, and I applaud him for stepping up. I also applaud his parents for allowing him to get involved in something he cares about and in something where he can make a difference.

Another thing that was sorely lacking – all of the people who have griped about columns I’ve written or articles I’ve penned in the local newspaper over the last six months.  Those people, the same ones who will call me in the months to come, as rules and regulations change, and complain that they don’t like those changes, they were the other element that was missing tonight. I did not see one of them there.  It seems not one of them was really willing to stand up for the things they call me or email me about. I understand it is much easier to sit in the tavern and complain to your buddies about what is wrong and how you could fix the whole system.  But the problem is, if you are given an avenue to comment, and you refuse to take the time to do so, then it truly cannot be that important to you.  So, before I hear from twenty of you when I print the statewide results (once they are available), please remember one thing.  It’s kind of like the election for president (or any other office) – if you didn’t vote, you don’t have the right to ….. gripe ….. about it.  Seriously.  Get out and make some meaningful change, if that is what you think needs to happen.

For all of you who made it to the spring hearings in your county, whether just to fill out your ballot, or if you stayed for the entire meeting, I applaud you.  I thank you, no matter if your opinion matches with mine or not, for taking the time to show you care about the future of the outdoors.  I wish there were more people like you.

KastKing launches awesome new line!

KastKing Launches Tournament Grade 
Monofilament Fishing Line
 
Advanced chemical formula from KastKing® creates dynamic Masters Mono fishing line for anglers who demand the best. 
(For Immediate Release – Garden City, Long Island NY – November  30, 2015) The KastKing® division of Eposeidon, Inc. (www.eposeidon.com) that manufactures fishing reels, rods, and line will offer a new high grade fishing line – KastKing® Masters Monofilament Fishing Line for 2016.
KastKing Masters Mono Introduced for 2016

KastKing® Masters professional tournament grade monofilament fishing line features outstanding smoothness for farther casting distance and more abrasion resistance than standard mono line.  Its unique chemical formula blend results in lower friction through fishing rod line guides. KastKing® Masters Mono has minimum stretch for improved hook-setting and low line memory for better control.  It also has more clarity under water than typical monofilament lines, which is an important factor when targeting line-shy species.

“KastKing® Masters Monofilament Fishing Line is exceptional.  It is a superior mono line product for tournament anglers looking for ultimate performance mono line at an affordable price,” says Tom Gahan marketing director at Eposeidon. “Its quality and features are extraordinary.”

KastKing® worked with chemical engineers from around the world and used new manufacturing methods and equipment developed to produce Masters Mono. “We will also continue to make our current KastKing® mono line, which is good stuff. KastKing® Masters Monofilament Fishing Line is for pros and recreational anglers looking for an edge,” added Gahan.

Crystal Clear KastKing® Masters Monofilament fishing line  comes in attractive packaging and is available on 300 yard/ 274 meter spools in 4 lb. / 1.8 kg., 6 lb. / 2.7 kg., 8 lb. / 3.6 kg., 10 lb. / 4.5 kg., 12 lb. / 5.4 kg., 14 lb. / 6.3 kg., 17 lb. / 7.7 kg., 20 lb. / 9.0 kg. , 25 lb. / 11.3 kg., and 30 lb. / 13.6 kg. test.  MSRP 4 lb. $10.98 USD, 6 lb. $11.98 USD, all other sizes are $12.98 USD.

KastKing® Masters Monofilament fishing line will sell below $10 USD throughwww.eposeidon.com,  http://www.kastking.com , Amazon.com, and other exclusive online retailers

View the KastKing® Masters Monofilament Fishing Line trailer here:

Crankbaits are Great Fishing Lures for Fall Bass

Many anglers start to put their fishing equipment away and winterize their boats when fall hits.  But many other anglers know that fall can mean just the start of some great fishing.  When the water temperatures start to drop, that is the signal to the bass that fall is close at hand.  They start to feed heavily in preparation for winter.

In the winter months, when the water temperatures are at their lowest, bass prefer not to chase bait fish.  They don’t like to move around much at all, if they can help it.  With that being said, fall is the time that bass start to build up their winter reserves.  This is not to say that every day on the water in the fall will be a fish fest, but there can be some awesome fishing when the leaves turn and the temperatures start to dip.  There are a number of fishing lures that anglers can use to get more fish to the boat in the fall.

When hunting for fall bass, one fishing lure that anglers should not disregard is the crankbait.  In the fall, crankbaits with a tight wiggle, rather than a wide wobble, are best.  They do a great job at imitating sick or injured bait fish.  Not only that, but you can cover a lot of water quickly.    They can also be slow-rolled along the bottom to look like a fleeing crayfish.  For this reason, crankbaits are popular with bass anglers throughout the entire fishing season.  In fall, when fish are feeding heavily, they can help anglers cover water and pattern the fish more quickly.

Once you find the fish, you might want to change your fishing lure selection.  You may want to slow down and throw a jig or a plastic worm.  For instance, if you’ve found fish on rock humps with a crank bait, you can then slow down and throw a slower bait.  Fish often congregate near rocks as the water cools because rocks hold heat.  At other times, you may find fish holding near wood or brush piles in shallower water.  Likely there will be deeper water near that cover.  Many anglers use wood crankbaits in heavier cover because they float up faster once the angler stops reeling.  Often this can avoid some of the snags anglers would otherwise experience.  But, switching to a slower moving bait can trigger strikes that crank baits do not.

Crankbaits are great lures to use to cover water and find fish.  Anglers should keep in mind, though, that different conditions call for different colors and sizes.  Try to match the forage as closely as possible when using crankbaits.  In darker water, brighter colors may work great.  In clear water, turn to more natural colors.  It is important that the crankbait you are throwing looks as much as possible like the forage on which the fish are feeding.  The closer you can match that, the more fish you will bring to the boat.

Once an angler has decided on the fishing lures to try for the day, all that is left is to find a lake in Wisconsin to fish.  With so many lakes all over the state, anglers are sure to find a great place to fish any day of the week this fall.
This article was written in association with FishingTackleLures.com.au

Check out Eposeidon

I’ve been working with Eposeidon for some time now, first in the capacity of a freelance writer, and then I was asked to join Team Eposeidon.  Since then I’ve had the opportunity to talk to a lot of different people about Eposeidon and KastKing reels, rods, and line.  People have asked me how they can keep their prices so low if their products are as high quality as I say they are.  Well, they’ve come up with this cool little video to explain just that, so I thought I would share it here.

I’ve been using the reels and the line since the beginning of this fishing season, and I am very impressed.  I’ve been using the KastKing Royale 6.3:1 bait casting reel all year and I have to say that it compares very closely to my Pinnacle Optimus X s that I’ve been using for the last few years.  And it’s much less than half the price. So, if you’re in the market for a new reel or a new rod, check out KastKing.  And if you’re needing line to get through those last few tournaments of the year, KastKing has Copolymer (which I’ve also been using all year with great results), fluorocarbon, mono, and even some really tough braid that I’ve used for dragging those big fish out of heavy cover.

Check out Eposeidon’s line of KastKing products, and check out this video if you get a chance, too.  You’ll be glad you did.

Eposeidon’s Manufacturer to Consumer business model.

Salmon season outlook full of uncertainty

Some thoughts on the Salmon season this year

The Outdoor Journal

Anglers can anticipate catching salmon again this summer, though the Lake Michigan alewife population remains at an all-time low. Photo: Howard Meyerson. Anglers can anticipate catching salmon again this summer, though the Lake Michigan alewife population remains at an all-time low. Photo: Howard Meyerson.

By Howard Meyerson

The 2015 salmon season is just getting underway and what anglers can expect remains uncertain. Lake Michigan fishing typically picks up in May but just where in the lake depends on water temperature. And so far lake waters have been uniformly very cold.

“It’s tough to pinpoint where the chinooks will be when water temperatures are the same around the lake,” said Jay Wesley, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources Lake Michigan basin coordinator. “But, fishing for lake trout, coho salmon, steelhead and brown trout has been decent. And I know of one 17-pound (chinook) that has been caught.”

Charter anglers around St. Joseph have had intermittent luck with chinooks so far. One recently called to share that fishing was sporadic — a 30-fish-day with…

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