Crankbaits are Great Fishing Lures for Fall Bass

Many anglers start to put their fishing equipment away and winterize their boats when fall hits.  But many other anglers know that fall can mean just the start of some great fishing.  When the water temperatures start to drop, that is the signal to the bass that fall is close at hand.  They start to feed heavily in preparation for winter.

In the winter months, when the water temperatures are at their lowest, bass prefer not to chase bait fish.  They don’t like to move around much at all, if they can help it.  With that being said, fall is the time that bass start to build up their winter reserves.  This is not to say that every day on the water in the fall will be a fish fest, but there can be some awesome fishing when the leaves turn and the temperatures start to dip.  There are a number of fishing lures that anglers can use to get more fish to the boat in the fall.

When hunting for fall bass, one fishing lure that anglers should not disregard is the crankbait.  In the fall, crankbaits with a tight wiggle, rather than a wide wobble, are best.  They do a great job at imitating sick or injured bait fish.  Not only that, but you can cover a lot of water quickly.    They can also be slow-rolled along the bottom to look like a fleeing crayfish.  For this reason, crankbaits are popular with bass anglers throughout the entire fishing season.  In fall, when fish are feeding heavily, they can help anglers cover water and pattern the fish more quickly.

Once you find the fish, you might want to change your fishing lure selection.  You may want to slow down and throw a jig or a plastic worm.  For instance, if you’ve found fish on rock humps with a crank bait, you can then slow down and throw a slower bait.  Fish often congregate near rocks as the water cools because rocks hold heat.  At other times, you may find fish holding near wood or brush piles in shallower water.  Likely there will be deeper water near that cover.  Many anglers use wood crankbaits in heavier cover because they float up faster once the angler stops reeling.  Often this can avoid some of the snags anglers would otherwise experience.  But, switching to a slower moving bait can trigger strikes that crank baits do not.

Crankbaits are great lures to use to cover water and find fish.  Anglers should keep in mind, though, that different conditions call for different colors and sizes.  Try to match the forage as closely as possible when using crankbaits.  In darker water, brighter colors may work great.  In clear water, turn to more natural colors.  It is important that the crankbait you are throwing looks as much as possible like the forage on which the fish are feeding.  The closer you can match that, the more fish you will bring to the boat.

Once an angler has decided on the fishing lures to try for the day, all that is left is to find a lake in Wisconsin to fish.  With so many lakes all over the state, anglers are sure to find a great place to fish any day of the week this fall.
This article was written in association with FishingTackleLures.com.au

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Check out Eposeidon

I’ve been working with Eposeidon for some time now, first in the capacity of a freelance writer, and then I was asked to join Team Eposeidon.  Since then I’ve had the opportunity to talk to a lot of different people about Eposeidon and KastKing reels, rods, and line.  People have asked me how they can keep their prices so low if their products are as high quality as I say they are.  Well, they’ve come up with this cool little video to explain just that, so I thought I would share it here.

I’ve been using the reels and the line since the beginning of this fishing season, and I am very impressed.  I’ve been using the KastKing Royale 6.3:1 bait casting reel all year and I have to say that it compares very closely to my Pinnacle Optimus X s that I’ve been using for the last few years.  And it’s much less than half the price. So, if you’re in the market for a new reel or a new rod, check out KastKing.  And if you’re needing line to get through those last few tournaments of the year, KastKing has Copolymer (which I’ve also been using all year with great results), fluorocarbon, mono, and even some really tough braid that I’ve used for dragging those big fish out of heavy cover.

Check out Eposeidon’s line of KastKing products, and check out this video if you get a chance, too.  You’ll be glad you did.

Eposeidon’s Manufacturer to Consumer business model.

Salmon season outlook full of uncertainty

Some thoughts on the Salmon season this year

The Outdoor Journal

Anglers can anticipate catching salmon again this summer, though the Lake Michigan alewife population remains at an all-time low. Photo: Howard Meyerson. Anglers can anticipate catching salmon again this summer, though the Lake Michigan alewife population remains at an all-time low. Photo: Howard Meyerson.

By Howard Meyerson

The 2015 salmon season is just getting underway and what anglers can expect remains uncertain. Lake Michigan fishing typically picks up in May but just where in the lake depends on water temperature. And so far lake waters have been uniformly very cold.

“It’s tough to pinpoint where the chinooks will be when water temperatures are the same around the lake,” said Jay Wesley, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources Lake Michigan basin coordinator. “But, fishing for lake trout, coho salmon, steelhead and brown trout has been decent. And I know of one 17-pound (chinook) that has been caught.”

Charter anglers around St. Joseph have had intermittent luck with chinooks so far. One recently called to share that fishing was sporadic — a 30-fish-day with…

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The Tournament Season is in Full Swing!

Tournament season has started, and I’ve fished two club tournaments, and have another big one coming up this weekend.  I say “big one”, but it’s not like I’m fishing the Elites or the FLW or anything.  But, for me, it’s a bigger tournament than a club tourney.    I’ll be fishing the first tournament of the year with the Upper Midwest Bass Challenge Series.  These guys are definitely a step above how I view a lot of club tournaments.  Don’t think I don’t think the guys in either of my bass clubs are good sticks, though.  Here’s my take on club tournaments.

In club tournaments, you have a really great dose of competition.  Every angler wants to win and they relish in bringing in a heavier bag to the scales at the end of the day.  But, in club tournaments, everyone gets along, and often they not only fish together, but are friends outside of the club.  For me, bass clubs exist to help everyone learn more about techniques, bodies of water, styles of fishing, and different lures that come along.  I think that bass clubs are about learning from other people.

That is not to say that you can’t learn anything from other anglers at team trails, opens, and other events, but there is more at stake.  The pots are obviously bigger, as are the bragging rights.  I love that idea, but it also makes it feel different than a simple club tourney.  And it should feel different.  It’s a different playing field and the players are more competitive at that level.  I’ve fished another team trail, the Central Wisconsin River Series presented by Minn Kota, Humminbird, and Point Beer, for a couple years now.  But this will be my first year with the U.M.B.C.S., and I’m not going to tell you that I’m not at least a bit nervous.  And I think you should be, going into a big tournament.  I think being nervous is good, because it makes you think harder and it makes you concentrate more.  At least that is the case with me.

I don’t think you can progress as an angler without checking out other circuits, some opens, and maybe even fishing with more than one club.  I think it’s almost a necessity.  That doesn’t make it easy and, for someone like me, who is fairly new to the tournament world, it may even be a bit intimidating.  But you just have to trust in yourself and your abilities, and then let the cards fall where they may.  Win, lose, or draw, this weekend will be a great experience for me, and I’m looking forward to competing against these guys.

So, bring on the weekend, the new competitors, and the new body of water.  I’ve been on the water only once, but luckily Rod, my partner in fishing and life, has been on it before.  It’s been years, but he at least has an idea of the lay of the land.  I only hope I can be helpful in the decision making process on the water.  I’m looking forward to all of the challenges that this tournament fishing year has to offer.

Good luck and tight lines, all!

Bass Rules: Year-round catch-and-release proposed

These proposed rule changes are for Michigan waters, but it’s still close enough that many of us fish those waters, and I think it’s really worth taking a look at this article.

The Outdoor Journal

Fly anglers who enjoy smallmouth bass fishing, like Wayne Andersen shown fishing Hamlin Lake, will be able to target them all year under the expanded catch-and-immediate-release season proposed. Photo: Howard Meyerson. Fly anglers who enjoy smallmouth bass fishing, like Wayne Andersen shown fishing Hamlin Lake, will be able to target them all year under the expanded catch-and-immediate-release season proposed. Photo: Howard Meyerson.

By Howard Meyerson

Michigan bass anglers could soon be enjoying more time on the water. The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is floating a proposed rule change to allow catch-and-immediate-release (CIR) bass fishing all-year, statewide – except on specific waters that are closed.

The proposed expansion of the CIR season would go into effect April 9, 2015, immediately following an approval by the state’s Natural Resources Commission. It was presented to the commission on March 19 at its Roscommon meeting. A final decision is expected at its April 9 meeting, in East Lansing. Meanwhile, the public has until then to comment.

Keeping bass is currently verboten outside of the possession season, which begins May 23 on most Michigan waters…

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Why You Should Join a Bass Fishing Club

I understand that not everyone is competitive.  And maybe that’s the reason more people, specifically more women, don’t join bass clubs.  But, really, you don’t have to be competitive.  Eventually, you may become that way – it’s just natural.  As far as just getting involved, though, it is really a great way to learn a lot about fishing, make some great friendships, and spend some time outdoors.  You shouldn’t feel out of place as a woman or a novice when you join a bass club.  The reason clubs exist is to help people learn new techniques and improve their fishing.  Everyone is there to learn something!

Another misconception about bass fishing is that is has to be really, really expensive.  You don’t need a lot of equipment, and you don’t need to spend a lot of money.  Don’t get me wrong.  At this point, I probably spend more on bass fishing than is prudent, but I’m okay with that.  It’s my hobby, my passion, and it could probably even be called my vice.  In reality, though, you can at least get started fairly inexpensively.

You don’t need fifteen expensive rods and reels to start with.  A couple spinning set-ups will work just fine to start.   You don’t need a bunch of tackle to start, either.  You might pick up a little terminal tackle like hooks and sinkers, a few bags of soft plastics, maybe a cheap spinnerbait or two, and call that good to start with.  I’ll cover tackle in another blog post, though.  But suffice it to say that you don’t need a boat load of tackle.  Heck, you don’t even need a boat!

That’s part of what’s great about fishing with a local bass club.  You can fish as either a boater or a non-boater.  Being a non-boater is just what it sounds like.  You fish with someone else out of his or her boat.  Even if you have a boat, when you first start out with a club, it can be a great idea to fish with someone else at least part of the time.  You can definitely learn a lot from the boaters in your club, and there’s no better way to do that than to spend a day in the back of their boats.

When you join a bass fishing club, you are really there to learn.  When I joined my first bass club, I didn’t know much of anything about bass fishing.  I’d done it a couple of times, but with varying amounts of success.  But when I joined the club, I really started to learn a lot.  I was very lucky to have my boyfriend who taught me so much about bass fishing.  But I did learn a lot from other guys in the club, too.

I think it’s a great idea for anyone who thinks they might want to try fishing, to join a club and just learn from other anglers.  Even if it’s only for a year, it’s a great way not only to learn, to be meet people who enjoy the same things you do – and you might even find you enjoy fishing more than you knew.  A simple Internet search can provide you with some clubs in your area.  Check them out and find one that works for you.  You will never know how much fun you’re missing if you don’t!

Welcome to my Fish Like a Girl US blog!

Thanks for checking in on my newest blog.  I am an avid bass angler and I truly enjoy being out on the water.  I fish club tournaments as well as two team circuits in Wisconsin.  I have several sponsor, who you will get to know if you follow this blog for any length of time.  They are:  RockyBrook Sinkers, Denali Rods, Secret Weapon Baits, Super K Jigs, and Stick ‘Um Graphics.  We also recently picked up FishingFundraiser.com, and I’m really excited about what they have to offer scholatic fishing teams in the way of fundraisers.

If you enjoy fishing, I hope you’ll enjoy my blog, and even check out my website http://www.fishlikeagirl.us  I’ll be posting pictures, podcasts, and even videos to that site as the season moves along.  In any case, I hope you find some great fishing information, or at least a reason to smile, in my posts and information here on this blog and on my website.

Thank you for stopping by and good fishing!